Posted on

how to get weed seeds into australia

How to get seeds into Australia!

The Australia post tracking says "received awaiting clearance for delivery" I wish they could just put "we have your seeds bitch and u ain’t getting them" at least then I would know

Mine been sitting in customs for 3 weeks now. Ordered from sea of seeds and the ultra stealth. Always got my beans through Melbourne moved back to QLD and been waiting 4 weeks since I ordered!! (took a week for royal mail to get em here to brizzy) Sea of seeds wont resend until they have been in customs for 4 weeks. If your in oz boy’s don’t take any note of that 21 days shit sos put on there site. Seems the seed banks have different rules for us Aussies!

ShazMo09
Active Member

Mine been sitting in customs for 3 weeks now. Ordered from sea of seeds and the ultra stealth. Always got my beans through Melbourne moved back to QLD and been waiting 4 weeks since I ordered!! (took a week for royal mail to get em here to brizzy) Sea of seeds wont resend until they have been in customs for 4 weeks. If your in oz boy’s don’t take any note of that 21 days shit sos put on there site. Seems the seed banks have different rules for us Aussies!

I ordered from Herbies and got mine in 9 days. Its not different rules for aussies from seed banks. its just shit luck. If customs never got them they would arrive within 21 days regardless.

Why revive this thread too, its been dead for 6 months if you didnt notice !

wahoo
Active Member

I ordered from Herbies and got mine in 9 days. Its not different rules for aussies from seed banks. its just shit luck. If customs never got them they would arrive within 21 days regardless.

Why revive this thread too, its been dead for 6 months if you didnt notice !

Because it showed up in google search so if the threads are dead maybe admin should block them from the search engines using the noindex tag or delete them!! But I’m sure they wouldn’t want to lose any free traffic from google would they? As for Herbies they have advised me that 20 working days starts from the day it leaves there shop. SOS seeds stats there 21 days starts the minute you receive your tracking number! Why the fuck have I been waiting over 5 weeks for a resend then. Customs more then likely have got the seeds! What I’m saying is I’m sitting here waiting for the resend way past the 21 days!

The rules are different for Aussies as far as sos seeds is concerned. They said to me "In your part of the world it has been known for orders to arrive in a 4 weeks after it hits customs so we can not act until such an such date" (took a week and a half just to get to customs) How is that not different rules?? Why don’t they post that on there site so us Aussies know before we order.

Oz post states if you have not received your parcel after 15 working days (3weeks), basically customs has seized your package! So I’m sitting here waiting for a date so they can do the resend.

Australia and Harvest Weed Seed Control

The Australians have developed wide-spread herbicide-resistant weed populations. In response to this situation, and in an effort to maintain highly productive reduced tillage systems, they have developed and adopted HWSC. Harvest weed seed control takes advantage of the biological attribute of seed retention at maturity in some annual weed species. In Australia, annual ryegrass retains about 80% of its seed at harvest, wild radish about 99%, brome grass about 77%, and wild oat about 84%. These retained weed seeds can enter the combine at harvest time and rather than spreading them back out over the entire field, basically helping them to spread, they can be processed in various ways to reduce their viability and spread.

The majority of weed seeds that enter the combine during harvest, exit in the chaff fraction. Consequently, the chaff fraction is the focus of HWSC systems. Chaff carts, which act as bulk chaff collection bins, were one of the first HWSC used in Australia. However, management of the large volumes of collected chaff is difficult and adoption rates for this system are low.

Narrow-windrow burning is currently the most commonly used HWSC system in Australia. With this system, a chute is attached to the rear of the combine that concentrates the chaff and straw into a 20- to 24-inch windrow. These windrows are subsequently burned, when environmental conditions are favorable. Research in Australia and Eastern Washington has shown that 99% of annual ryegrass seed in the windrow is destroyed by this method. However, this system has several drawbacks including the destruction of crop residues that are critical for collecting and retaining soil water, reducing soil erosion, and promoting soil health. It also results in smoke, which poses health and safety issues.

The bale direct system uses a large square baler attached directly behind the combine that builds bales from the chaff, which contains the weed seeds, and straw exiting the combine. This system requires available markets for the baled material. There are concerns over removing too much crop residue, which is a source for both carbon and plant nutrients, and spreading weed seed as bales are moved on roads and highways.

The development and integration of impact mills, such as the integrated Harrington Seed Destructor, into the rear of combines, has shown great promise for processing the chaff during harvest to sufficiently control weed seeds. Currently, the cost of purchasing and operating this equipment is prohibitively high for many growers, but as development continues and costs come down, this may be the preferred HWSC system.

Many Australian farmers are using controlled traffic systems where they drive the same wheel tracks for all their field operations. This requires that all their equipment be set-up with the same wheel widths and that all the equipment is of the same width or factor of the same base width, for example, a 30-ft wide combine head and drill, and a 90-ft wide sprayer. Although controlled traffic allows chaff lines to be placed in the same spot every year, it is not critical to the success of chaff lining, although it is required for chaff tramlining.

Concentrating the chaff in narrow rows creates a hostile environment for weed seed germination and emergence. Those weeds that do emerge and grow are concentrated in the narrow rows where they compete with each other, thus reducing seed production, and affect less of the crop area. Subsequent weed control efforts, if required, can be concentrated on these narrow strips in the field. Chaff tramlining places the seed in the wheel rows where the soil is compacted, making growth and development even more difficult.

Tillage and residue burning affects weed populations and seed banks

An integrated weed management approach requires alternative management practices to herbicide use such as tillage, crop rotations and cultural controls to reduce soil weed seed banks. The objective of this study was to examine the value of different tillage practices and stubble burning to exhaust the seed bank of common weeds from the northern grain region of Australia. Five tillage and burning treatments were incorporated in a field experiment, at Armidale (30 degrees 30’S, 151 degrees 40’E), New South Wales, Australia in July 2004 in a randomized block design replicated four times. The trial was continued and treatments repeated in July 2005 with all the mature plants from the first year being allowed to shed seed in their respective treatment plots. The treatments were (i) no tillage (NT), (ii) chisel ploughing (CP), (iii) mould board ploughing (MBP), (iv) wheat straw burning with no tillage (SBNT) and (v) wheat straw burning with chisel ploughing (SBC). Soil samples were collected before applying treatments and before the weeds flowered to establish the seed bank status of the various weeds in the soil. Wheat was sown after the tillage treatments. Burning treatments were only initiated in the second year, one month prior to tillage treatments. The major weeds present in the seed bank before initiating the trial were Polygonum aviculare, Sonchus oleraceus and Avena fatua. Tillage promoted the germination of other weeds like Hibiscus trionum, Medicago sativa, Vicia sp. and Phalaris paradoxa later in the season in 2004 and Convolvulus erubescens emerged as a new weed in 2005. The MBP treatment in 2004 reduced the weed biomass to a significantly lower level of 55 g/m2 than the other treatments of CP (118 g/m2) and NT plots (196 g/m2) (P < 0.05). However, in 2005 SBC and MBP treatments were similar in reducing the weed biomass. In 2004, the grain yield trend of wheat was significantly different between CP and NT, and MBP and NT (P < 0.05) with maximum yield of 5898 kg/ha in CP and 5731 kg/ha in MBP. Rainfall before the start of the second trial season promoted the germination of a large numbers of weeds. SBC and MBP treatments reduced the numbers of most of the individual weed species compared with CP, SBNT and NT. SBC was able to destroy a large proportion of seeds most likely through burning and burying some in the soil and was found to be the best treatment in exhausting the seed bank followed closely by MBP which probably buried large number of seeds deep in the soil and promoted others to germinate. CP might have buried some of the seeds in the top 5-10 cm but also promoted parts of the seed bank to germinate. SBNT and NT provided an ideal medium for weeds to germinate and resulted in heavy infestations of weeds.