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jesus said weed out bad seeds

Pulling Weeds

We have had a lot of rain this season. This generally means that our lawns are green; plants are growing. It also means that weeds are growing. Weeds grow right along with the grass, flowers and any other seeds that have been planted.

Sometimes it’s difficult to get rid of the weeds without also hurting some of the plants you actually WANT to grow.

Jesus told a similar story in describing life in the Kingdom of God. It’s a story that is meant to teach us something about the reality of living in this world.

The Parable of the Weeds

Jesus told them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven is like a man who sowed good seed in his field. 25 But while everyone was sleeping, his enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and went away. 26 When the wheat sprouted and formed heads, then the weeds also appeared.

27 “The owner’s servants came to him and said, ‘Sir, didn’t you sow good seed in your field? Where then did the weeds come from?’

28 “‘An enemy did this,’ he replied.

“The servants asked him, ‘Do you want us to go and pull them up?’

29 “‘No,’ he answered, ‘because while you are pulling the weeds, you may uproot the wheat with them. 30 Let both grow together until the harvest. At that time, I will tell the harvesters: First collect the weeds and tie them in bundles to be burned; then gather the wheat and bring it into my barn.’” (Matthew 13:24-43 NIV)

Remember Jesus was telling a parable. All of this would have been common knowledge to Jesus’ audience.

What does this parable mean? Fortunately, Jesus tells us what this parable means.

The Parable of the Weeds Explained

Then He left the crowd and went into the house. His disciples came to Him and said, “Explain to us the parable of the weeds in the field.”

37 He answered, “The one who sowed the good seed is the Son of Man. 38 The field is the world, and the good seed stands for the people of the kingdom. The weeds are the people of the evil one, 39 and the enemy who sows them is the devil. The harvest is the end of the age, and the harvesters are angels.

40 “As the weeds are pulled up and burned in the fire, so it will be at the end of the age. 41 The Son of Man will send out His angels, and they will weed out of His kingdom everything that causes sin and all who do evil. 42 They will throw them into the blazing furnace, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. 43 Then the righteous will shine like the sun in the kingdom of their Father. Whoever has ears, let them hear.” (Matthew 13:36-43)

This parable is clear. We have 7 images in this parable: the sower, the field, the good seed, the weeds, the enemy, the harvest and the reapers.

Jesus decodes each of the seven images.

  1. The sower: Son of Man, that is, Jesus Himself
  2. The field: the world
  3. The good seed: the sons of the kingdom, that is, Christians, believers, the righteous
  4. The weeds: the sons of the evil one, that is, unbelievers, the wicked
  5. The enemy: the devil
  6. The harvest: the close of the age, that is, the end of this age, when the separation of the righteous and the wicked will occur
  7. The reapers: angels

What Should We Do About the Weeds?

We generally pull the weeds, spray with Round Up – figure out how to get rid of them. But it is important that we understand their source and know their destiny.

The weeds in our life are planted by whom? The source is the Devil.

What is the destiny of the devil? Hell forever

Satan has been God’s enemy nearly from the beginning. Satan has sown weeds in the field of the world. He has probably planted some weeds in your life.

The devil puts bad things in our life on purpose. He did this with Adam and Eve. He did this with Job in the Old Testament and he continues to do it to us today. The devil would like more than anything else for it to take root and grow – take root meaning establish itself in our lives and be a strong presence.

We all have baggage in life – baggage that is and was caused by bad seeds planted in our lives from the devil. It’s baggage because we are still carrying it around with us. It’s baggage that is weighing us down.

Maybe you have heard people use the phrase – “they come with baggage” or “he has a lot of baggage.” What they mean is that their pasts are full of painful things that have happened to them and they seem to be carrying it with them throughout their lives. They carry it with them either because they can’t let it go or don’t know how to let it go. Frequently, others make it difficult for them let it go.

We all have a baggage journey. It could have started early in life and it can still happen later in life; we carry it with us, and it weighs us down. Like the weeds we need to get rid of it.

The parable of the weeds tells us that the devil is putting the bad seed in our lives. He is planting. He sneaks in. He has bad intentions. This bad seed turns out to be baggage in our lives and we must figure out how to get rid of it. We must separate the weeds from the wheat.

The Bible tell us HOW to Deal with our Baggage.

1. Baggage comes from the Enemy, the Devil.

First Peter 5:8 says, “Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.” That’s a little dark to put in a letter meant to bring people hope, but it is reality. Many of you have baggage and can’t even identify that it comes from the Enemy. We have one enemy, the Devil. Yet, we have hope in what’s next…

2. WE can resist the Devil.

Peter tells us to resist the devil (1 Peter 5:9). The Bible wouldn’t tell us to do it if we couldn’t do it! Can you resist the devil? YES – What? Can you resist the devil? YES!

We learn that all Christians suffer, but Christ is bigger than the suffering. If you struggle, you’re not alone!

There’s still a third thing Peter teaches us here and it’s important…

3. Humility is the key to losing our baggage.

What is humility? I used to think of it in negative terms, but as a Christ follower I think differently. The dictionary defines humility as, “a modest view of one’s importance.” We are humble when we realize we aren’t the most important thing in the universe. It also means that we can’t lose our baggage all by ourselves; we need divine help. We need help from God.

First identify your baggage. Then, realize you can defeat the Enemy when you become humble and recognize the need for Jesus to take control of your life.

The Ultimate Promise

Check this out! 1 Peter 5:10 says that after we have suffered for a little while, the God of all grace, who has called you to eternal glory in Christ, will Himself restore, confirm, strengthen, and establish you.

Let Jesus be the Roundup for the weeds in your life. Lay your baggage at the foot of the cross so that you are free to live! Remember the words of John: The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life and have it to the full (John 10:10).

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This Week’s Sermon – Weeding Out the Church

Jesus told them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven is like a man who sowed good seed in his field. But while everyone was sleeping, his enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and went away. When the wheat sprouted and formed heads, then the weeds also appeared. “The owner’s servants came to him and said, ‘Sir, didn’t you sow good seed in your field? Where then did the weeds come from?’ “‘An enemy did this,’ he replied. “The servants asked him, ‘Do you want us to go and pull them up?’ “‘No,’ he answered, ‘because while you are pulling the weeds, you may uproot the wheat with them. Let both grow together until the harvest. At that time I will tell the harvesters: First collect the weeds and tie them in bundles to be burned; then gather the wheat and bring it into my barn.’”

Then he left the crowd and went into the house. His disciples came to him and said, “Explain to us the parable of the weeds in the field.” He answered, “The one who sowed the good seed is the Son of Man. The field is the world, and the good seed stands for the people of the kingdom. The weeds are the people of the evil one, and the enemy who sows them is the devil. The harvest is the end of the age, and the harvesters are angels. “As the weeds are pulled up and burned in the fire, so it will be at the end of the age. The Son of Man will send out his angels, and they will weed out of his kingdom everything that causes sin and all who do evil. They will throw them into the blazing furnace, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. Then the righteous will shine like the sun in the kingdom of their Father. Whoever has ears, let them hear.

SERMON
Weeding Out the Church
Matt. 13:24-30, 36-43
July 17, 2011

I want to tell you about Claire. Claire was one of the first youth I met at a church I served during seminary. It was my first real church position, so I was eager to get in there and show the congregation what I could do, to convert all those heathen youth, to begin sowing some good seeds. I planned a great first gathering and had a deeply profound Bible study and some tasty refreshments ready to go. This was going to be a life-changing meeting!

Three people showed up. And one was Claire. I knew as soon as she walked in the room I was in trouble. Hair dyed black. Black clothes. A look on her face like someone just ran over her dog. I found out later that she was a terrible student in school, hung out with the bad crowd, and listened to loud, offensive music. Through the whole meeting she just sat there, looking depressed and dejected. She didn’t even take any refreshments! Inside, I was mad. This wasn’t how my ministry was supposed to begin. There was a weed in my wheat.

That’s why I relate to the servants in our parable today. When they see that weeds have begun to grow among their master’s wheat, their first response is, “Let’s pluck them up! Let’s barrel into the fields and begin yanking up anything that looks suspicious. That will show those pesky weeds!” But their patient master says, “No, boys, let’s wait. If you go uprooting all the weeds, you may damage the wheat, and then all is lost. Let’s wait until they mature, and then we’ll separate them.” The Bible stops the dialogue there, but I know what the servants say next. “What? Leave the weeds in there? How can we do that? They’re bad, the wheat is good. It’s as simple as that. We need to take a stand, we need to draw the line. We need to say, ‘Wheat, you stay, but Weed, you go!’”

That’s response we can cheer for, isn’t it? Because the world is full of weeds. There are weeds everywhere. Jesus defines the weeds as “the sons of the evil one.” I define the weeds as anyone who’s keeping me from loving God and living the life God called me to live. There are people out there who are just plain rude, nasty, and uncouth. They cut me off in traffic and don’t use their turn signals, they take 12 items into the 10-items-or-less line at the grocery store, they don’t push in their chairs at the mall food court. I know everyone in here can name a weed or two in your life.

Of course, there are more serious weeds we deal with. Child molesters. Murderers. Corporate con artists. These weeds do more than just look bad, they choke the life out of the wheat growing around them. They hog all the good soil for themselves, not sharing any with the other plants that are clinging to life. They gulp the water while the wheat shrivels from dehydration. Yes, there are weeds all around us and the deserve nothing more than to be plucked up and thrown away.

I hate to say this out loud, but there are even weeds in the church. Not our church, thank goodness; but I’ve been in other churches where the pristine field of wheat was littered with crabgrass and thistles. These people complained about everything, they gossiped and started rumors, and although they had much, they gave little. Ugly, nasty, repulsive weeds. How can we be the church with so many weeds around? Can you understand why the servants wanted to get the weeds out of the way? It’s hard to be good wheat with all those weeds around.

There’s been a lot of that down through the years, efforts to clarify who’s a weed and who’s wheat. Sometimes that’s even done in the name of God, as if God gave us the power to say who counts and who doesn’t, and the ones labeled weeds get rounded up and huddled into refugee settlements and concentration camps. Turn us loose with our machetes and there’s no telling what we’ll chop down and what we’ll spare.

But in our parable, the master has more patience and foresight. He tells his hasty servants to wait. Part of his reasoning is practical. Young wheat and young weeds can look very similar in appearance. It’s impossible to tell them apart. And by the time they both mature, their roots are so intertwined that you can’t pull up one without pulling up the other. To uproot the weeds now could bring about economic ruin, because the harvest of wheat would be destroyed, as well. The only solution then, was to wait, let them both grow and sort them out later.

That may not be soon enough for us stalks of wheat, but there’s wisdom in that line of thinking. As much as I’d like to think I know a weed when I see one, I don’t. Our house in Illinois had some beautiful flowers and landscaping, but during the time that the previous people moved out and we moved in, the yard became infested with weeds. Well, as a first-time homeowner, I was ready to go out into my yard and begin enforcing some agricultural justice on those renegade plants. Problem was, once I fired up the weed-whacker and set to work, I wasn’t sure what to kill and what to keep. I might be tempted to chop something down, only to find it in a vase on my kitchen table later that evening. We think we know the weeds in life, and if you catch us in the right mood we’ll even name names, but we don’t know. Only God truly knows.

Another reason we should wait before pulling up the weeds is that, if we look closely enough, we might find weeds in our own garden. A Far Side cartoon showed the inside of a refrigerator. The bottle of ketchup, a head of lettuce and a block of cheese were all huddled to one side of the fridge, their faces covered with fear and their hands in the air. On the other side of the fridge was a carton holding a gun. The caption read, “When sour cream goes bad.” We’ve all got some bad sour cream in our refrigerators, don’t we?

Our hearts are a mixture of good and evil; no one is purely one or the other. We all live with that constant tension in our hearts of trying to grow our wheat while fighting the weeds. But because of our imperfection, our humanness, our poor choices, we sow bad seeds along with the good, so we are all in need of mercy. Some folks may like to think that there are two kinds of people in the world – wheat and weeds. Wouldn’t life we easier if that were the case? In reality, everyone is a little bit of both.

If everyone is a little bit of both, then everyone has the potential to be transformed by God’s power and love. In the world of agriculture, weeds may contaminate wheat. But in God’s garden, wheat can transform weeds. I certainly forgot it when dealing with Claire. I judged her as weed right away, and that diagnosis colored how I dealt with her for a long time. But I watched as she came to know God, and I watched how God changed Claire, how God’s word took root in her heart. She became a vibrant member of the youth group. She’s matured into a beautiful young woman, full of dreams and aspirations, and with a solid faith in God. She just got married Do you know what happened? Where I only saw weeds, God saw wheat.

That’s what God can do if we give God the space to do it. God can take a person full of anger, of envy, of animosity, and turn them into a person full of love, grace and mercy. A person is not to be judged by a single act or stage of life, but by their whole life. It’s a difficult thing for us to look at someone who’s acting like weed and say, “You know, there’s wheat in that person somewhere.” But on our worst days, that’s what God does with us. In my backyard, I’ve never seen a dandelion turn into a rose, no matter how hard I pray. But in my ministry, given a little time and a lot of love and forgiveness, I’ve seen a weed of a person blossom into a flower.

So what do we do? How do the wheat survive if they have to live among the weeds? Do we spend all our time attacking the weeds or do we devote our time to being wheat? I’ve seen people who consider themselves wheat to get so riled up and defensive that they start sounded a lot like weeds. “That person calls themselves a Christian, and yet they say THAT? They do THAT?” This parable reminds us that it’s not our job to weed out the world; it’s our job to be wheat, even in a messy field, rooting ourselves in the One who planted us.

We are called to be the best wheat we can be, and to trust that God will work through us to bring nourishment and sunlight to those around us. In the ultimate end, we can’t control what’s going to happen to the weeds; we just have to make sure we aren’t one of them. As Annie Dillard says in The Writing Life, “There is no shortage of good days. It is good lives that are hard to come by.” Our goal is to live good lives, honoring God and following Christ, proclaiming the gospel in how we live and treat others. The foot of the cross is surrounded by stalks of wheat. Are we there?

There are going to be weeds in our life, probably on a daily basis. We’re even going to find weeds in our families, maybe even in our church. And scariest of all, we may even discover weeds in our own hearts. Thankfully, we have a Master Gardener who’s slow to pluck up and burn. He’s patient with us, allowing us time to grow and mature and transform. We have been shown such tremendous mercy and forgiveness by our loving God. May we have the strength to live our lives as fully as possibly, and to let God do the sorting out in the end. Because you just never know what God is doing, do you? You just never know how God is turning weeds into wheat in this world…and within us.

Jesus said weed out bad seeds

Posted on August 16, 2017 by Steven Richichi

War Of The Seeds

To have a lawn is to view on a small scale the battle that has taken place on the earth since Creation. It is a battle for dominion between the grass and the weeds or the “good seed” and the “bad seed.”

It is a real battle! The Oxford American Dictionary defines weeds as “a wild plant growing where it is not wanted and in competition with cultivated plants.” Establishing dominion in my lawn requires a twofold effort: plantingand removing. You can’t tolerate or negotiate with them. You must destroy them.

God also has a weed problem. In fact, the entire history of the world can be summed up as God’s trying to get healthy plants to grow by overcoming the weeds. Biblical history is a war between two seeds. Matthew 13:24-30 (ESV) He put another parable before them, saying, “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a man who sowed good seed in his field, 25 but while his men were sleeping, his enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat and went away. 26 So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared also. 27 And the servants of the master of the house came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? How then does it have weeds?’ 28 He said to them, ‘An enemy has done this.’ So the servants said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ 29 But he said, No, lest in gathering the weeds you root up the wheat along with them. 30 Let both grow together until the harvest, and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, “Gather the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.”’”

The parable of the wheat and tares is a metaphor for two very real types of persons who are set against one another in a cosmic conflict for universal dominion. Matthew 13:36-43 (ESV) Then he left the crowds and went into the house. And his disciples came to him, saying, “Explain to us the parable of the weeds of the field.” 37 He answered, “The one who sows the good seed is the Son of Man. 38 The field is the world, and the good seed is the sons of the kingdom. The weeds are the sons of the evil one, 39 and the enemy who sowed them is the devil. The harvest is the end of the age, and the reapers are angels. 40 Just as the weeds are gathered and burned with fire, so will it be at the end of the age. 41 The Son of Man will send his angels, and they will gather out of his kingdom all causes of sin and all law-breakers, 42 and throw them into the fiery furnace. In that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. 43 Then the righteous will shine like the sun in the kingdom of their Father. He who has ears, let him hear. The landowner, God, knew that the tares (children of the wicked one) were not just an accident, but were an evil intended by his enemy (Satan) to destroy his progress. His solution: not merely the exposing of evil, but the maturing of the wheat. We destroy evil by crowding it out with righteousness.

The children of the wicked one are the offspring of Satan, and mimic the dominion calling of the church. They are committed to victory… a victory that is defined by the removal of all vestiges of “wheatness” from every area of life. The tares seek to remove God’s name from every area of life; the children of the kingdom are be engraving God’s name on every area of life.

Gen. 3:14-15 Jesus presents history as the children of the Kingdom struggling against the children of the wicked one, those who were planted by an enemy of God. Genesis 3:14-15 (ESV) The Lord God said to the serpent, “Because you have done this, cursed are you above all livestock and above all beasts of the field; on your belly you shall go, and dust you shall eat all the days of your life. 15 I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and her offspring; he shall bruise your head, and you shall bruise his heel.”

Genesis 4:7-8 (ESV) If you do well, will you not be accepted? And if you do not do well, sin is crouching at the door. Its desire is contrary to you, but you must rule over it.” 8 Cain spoke to Abel his brother. And when they were in the field, Cain rose up against his brother Abel and killed him. It didn’t take long for the war to begin. Cain, the tare planted by the wicked one, removed and silenced the wheat, Abel. 1 John 3:7-10 (NLT) Dear children, don’t let anyone deceive you about this: When people do what is right, it shows that they are righteious, even as Christ is righteous. 8 But when people keep on sinning, it shows that they belong to the devil, who has been sinning since the beginning. But the Son of God came to destroy the works of the devil. 9 Those who have been born into God’s family do not make a practice of sinning, because God’s life is in them. So they can’t keep on sinning, because they are children of God. 10 So now we can tell who are children of God and who are children of the devil. Anyone who does not live righteiously and does not love other believers does not belong to God.

Like weeds, tares quickly multiply without any purposeful cultivation while the wheat requires great diligence that can often yields meager results. Genesis 6:5-7 (ESV) The Lord saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every intention of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. 6 And the Lord regretted that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him to his heart. 7 So the Lord said, “I will blot out man whom I have created from the face of the land, man and animals and creeping things and birds of the heavens, for I am sorry that I have made them.

The result was an entire generation that nearly choked out all the wheat. As in Matt. 13, God removed the weeds and left the wheat! Noah’s charge was to fill the Earth with wheat again. Genesis 9:1 (ESV) And God blessed Noah and his sons and said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth.

Later the tares had to be dealt with again at Babylon. They did not want to be scattered, they wanted to rule. This has long been the desire of the tares: to build world ruling empires that tyrannize other men. It stems from their desire to be as God. Genesis 11:1-4 (ESV) Now the whole earth had one language and the same words. 2 And as people migrated from the east, they found a plain in the land of Shinar and settled there. 3 And they said to one another, “Come, let us make bricks, and burn them thoroughly.” And they had brick for stone, and bitumen for mortar. 4 Then they said, “Come, let us build ourselves a city and a tower with its top in the heavens, and let us make a name for ourselves, lest we be dispersed over the face of the whole earth.” Note: They want physical territory.

God scattered them so they couldn’t unify for world wide dominion. Genesis 11:7-9 (ESV) Come, let us go down and there confuse their language, so that they may not understand one another’s speech.” 8 So the Lord dispersed them from there over the face of all the earth, and they left off building the city. 9 Therefore its name was called Babel, because there the Lord confused the language of all the earth. And from there the Lord dispersed them over the face of all the earth.

Hegel’s definition of the divine: “The state is God walking on earth.”

Here is the lesson that we need to learn with practical application to current and future elections: because they have no power from God, the only manner in which “tares” can rule is through an expansive civil government. This is especially true in the United States where a once independent republic of self-governing peoples have gradually reached a the form of serfdom to an ever expanding, massive, federal bureaucracy – man’s New World order.

“The tares of today – just like those of previous years – are utilizing the power of the state to restrict, silence, and eventually eliminate the voice of the wheat. There is no other way this can be accomplished. Only a massive civil government has the capacity to play such restrictions on righteousness while codifying wickedness into law. Among other things this is the premise behind abortion – it’s in institutionalizing of state-sponsored murder. It is also the force behind endorsing homosexuality and the redefinition of marriage.

The Wheat and the Tares of the story of history, and it’s a story in which we all play a pivotal role especially here in America where we have the power to determine who will govern us, and how.

In a “perfect” world the choice would be absolutely clear between the two opposing kingdoms. Unfortunately we are not in a perfect world, so we can only vote for government and leaders according to their tendencies, do they tend to “Wheat” or “tares?” To not vote is to let the field grow wild with obvious results. If you are a Christian you have a God given responsibility to promote “Wheat” growth, not personalities or personal preferences. Here is a contrast that you can apply names to:

“Wheat”: Small government, individual responsibility, promote entrepreneurship

Tares: Big government, collective responsibility, promote victimization and class warfare

“Wheat”: Lower taxes to promote personal industry. What you tax you discourage.

“Tares”: Higher taxes, especially to those who are the most productive members

“Wheat”: Protect human life at all stages

“Tares”: Life is a personal choice, not a personal responsibility

“Wheat”: Free speech

“Tares”: Muzzled or “correct” speech only. We must stop “wheat seeds” from spreading

“Wheat”: People are more important than environment – this is a tax policy!

“Tares”: Environment is more important than people

Christopher J. Ortiz, God’s Story for Christian Dominion: the Ancient Secret of the Wheat and the Tares, Chalcedon Report, Sept/Oct. 2008