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morning glory weed seeds

MORNING GLORY

Morning Glory is a hybrid sativa dominant Marijuana strain. It provides a potent and durable cerebral effect. After 10 weeks of flowering it will yield ver resinous buds.

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  • Terpenes Complex
  • Type Hybrid
  • Flowering time Average
  • Cannabinoids Active
  • Yield capacity Average
  • Height Medium
  • Cultivation needs A few
  • Family Afghan

Feminized Morning Glory Marijuana Seeds

Morning Glory is a feminized Marijuana strain from Barney’s Farm. This seedbank aimed to developed a fantastic strain through a very careful genetic selection process favoring the productivity, fast flowering period and great cerebral effect.

This meticulous selection process has resulted in a hybrid sativa dominant plant with a mixture of Hawaiian, Afghan and Skunk genetics. Morning Glory can be cultivated both indoors and outdoors. In the inside this strain reaches heights of 75 or 85 cm developing few lateral branches but in the garden its growth is increased being able to reach 2 meters high.

It has an moderate productivity, with yields that can reach 450g per square meter indoors in optimal environmental conditions. It is ready to harvest in a quite fast flowering period for a sativa of around 10 weeks. In the outside the buds can be collected between late September and early October. By then, these buds will be covered already by a thick layer of resin.

Since Morning Glory has a high level of THC of 20%, it offers a very potent and durable effect, even for regular smokers. Nonetheless, this high will not leavy sleepy or levered on the couch: on the contrary, it is extremely energetic. It will hit directly the brain with a mix of psychedlia and happiness able to boost the creativity, thoughts and sexual desire. The body will also be hit by an energetic boost. Hence, this strain is perfect to start the day with a great encouragement or to smoke it surrounded by friends.

It has a sour and a citric taste mixed with spices, sandalwood and earthy touches and a chemical aftertaste. In the wide range of perfumes, Morning Glory has a pine, a pepper and a hash aroma. However, the smoke is very smooth with delicate notes of white pepper and almonds.

The quality of Morning Glory was awarded in 2002 at the High Times Marijuana Cup.

Morning glories got you in a bind? Not if planted by seed

Question: I planted beautiful blue morning glories by seed late this spring. They are growing up a trellis in a large pot on my deck. Last weekend, my new neighbors came over for a barbecue, and they were shocked that I would grow them as they said “they are such a terrible weed.” I want to make sure I’m not growing something noxious. What gives? What don’t I know? Thanks.

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Answer: “Morning Glory” is one of those names that means different things to different people. There are terrible noxious weeds that many now call “bindweeds” that, in the old days, were commonly called “morning glories.”

First of all, you have nothing to worry about with your beautiful blue morning-glory plantings. The kind you plant from seed, from a seed packet, is not noxious. They are generally from the genus Ipomoea, native to Mexico and Central America. There are more than 500 species in this genus, including sweet potato.

Horticultural varieties of morning can become noxious in warmer climates. But I’ve never seen it spread wildly here, as it cannot survive any freezing temperatures.

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What your neighbors were probably referring to are the bindweed-type morning glories, a different species and noxious weeds in Oregon. There are two species of the weedy culprits common in our area. Both are in the genus Convolvulus.

Field bindweed, Convolvulus arvensis, is a deep-rooted perennial that spreads by seed and/or a deep, extensive root system. Field bindweed scares me. I have been pulling it on the roadsides of my neighborhood for years. I don’t have it in my garden and want to keep it that way. My neighbors have it and have been battling it for years. They’ve tried herbicides, solarization and pigs.

Seed from field bindweed can persist in soil for up to 60 years. Scary, huh? Its roots can grow up to 30 feet deep. It grows up and over anything in its path. Much like pole beans, bindweed’s stems rotate in a circular pattern until they make contact with a solid structure (fence posts, other plants, etc.). Each stem wraps around the object as it grows. If you have it, prepare to battle with it for years.

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Weed scientists at Oregon State University have told me over the years that the best way to get rid of field bindweed is to pull it up, over and over, at least every three weeks. Its roots should be depleted in a couple of years if you persist.

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Identifying field bindweed can be a bit tricky. Its arrow-shaped leaves grow opposite each other along each stem. When juvenile stems are broken, they exude a milky sap. The flowers, smaller than those of domestic morning glory, are white to pink and trumpet-shaped.

There’s a related larger species of bindweed called hedge bindweed, or Convolvulus sepium. It has a larger white flower that is about as big as a domestic blue morning glory. Also a perennial vine, hedge bindweed is found more in riparian areas and is spread by seeds in water and by birds. It also can climb, twine and cover great distances.

How do you tell the difference between our two thuggish bindweeds? Weed scientists say that the most definitive way to identify these two cousins apart is by their bracts, leafy appendages below the flowers. Hedge bindweed has two large bracts that almost completely cover the calyx, unlike field bindweed with two tiny bracts well below the flower.

Hedge bindweed’s root system is not as expansive as that of field bindweed, described above. It does not withstand cultivation as well as field bindweed, so that is a way to control it.

Heavenly Blue

West Coast Seeds ships anywhere in North America. However, we are not able to ship garlic, potatoes, asparagus crowns, bulbs, onion sets, Mason bee cocoons, or nematodes outside of Canada. We regret, we cannot accept returns or damages for orders outside of Canada. The minimum shipping charge to the US is $6.99.

More details about Heavenly Blue

Ipomoea tricolor. It is a great shame that so many gardeners confuse this tidy heirloom annual with the invasive weed Convovulus arvensis. Both share the name Morning Glory, and both have trumpet shaped flowers, but the similarities end there. Heavenly Blue morning glory seeds produce short vines bearing copious, huge, intensely blue flowers that open each morning and then fade to pink before closing for good in the evening. Every day more flowers open from mid to late summer. It looks spectacular climbing along a fence or trellis, with really large flowers that can only be described as Heavenly Blue.

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Note: This variety is not an invasive weed.

Quick Facts:

    • NOT the invasive weed
    • Copious, intensely blue flowers
    • Flowers fade to pink in evening
    • Trumpet shaped flowers
    • Heirloom annual

    All About Heavenly Blue

    Latin

    Latin
    lpomoea tricolor
    Family: Convovulaceae

    Difficulty

    Difficulty
    Easy

    Season & Zone

    Season & Zone
    Exposure: Full sun

    Timing

    Timing
    Direct sow where they are to grow 1-2 weeks after the last frost date. Or try sowing some indoors in peat or coir pots 3-4 weeks before last frost, but they do not transplant well. If starting indoors, chip the seeds and soak them in warm water for 24 hours, and then provide a constant soil temperature of 21-30°C (70-85°F). The seeds should sprout in 5-21 days, but may be longer outdoors. Be patient.

    Starting

    Starting
    Sow seeds 5mm (¼”) deep. Space or thin to 30-45cm (12-18″) between plants.

    Growing

    Growing
    Make sure to provide some support for these tall vines to climb up. Moist, well drained soil that is not too nitrogen-rich is ideal. Excess nitrogen leads to large, bushy vines with fewer flowers. Dry soil is tolerated. Pinch the tips of the plants as soon as you see them start to climb in order to produce branching growth.

    How to Grow Morning Glory

    Step 1: Timing

    Direct sow where they are to grow 1-2 weeks after the last frost date. Or try sowing some indoors in peat or coir pots 3-4 weeks before last frost, but they do not transplant well. If starting indoors, chip the seeds and soak them in warm water for 24 hours, and then provide a constant soil temperature of 21-30°C (70-85°F). The seeds should sprout in 5-21 days, but may be longer outdoors. Be patient.

    Step 2: Starting

    Sow seeds 5mm (¼”) deep. Space or thin to 30-45cm (12-18″) between plants.

    Step 3: Growing

    Make sure to provide some support for these tall vines to climb up. Moist, well drained soil that is not too nitrogen-rich is ideal. Excess nitrogen leads to large, bushy vines with fewer flowers. Dry soil is tolerated. Pinch the tips of the plants as soon as you see them start to climb in order to produce branching growth.