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south american seeds

South american seeds

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South american seeds

What is a D-pak? You said, “Give me more than a packet but less than a pound”. We said “d-pak”. d=DIVERSITY

Great women and men make Native American Seed the go-to team for native seeds. With gratitude, we ask your help. Help Connect us with passionate others. Help good People in pursuit of purposeful careers, those with rich skills and interests, to find us. Native American Seed has offerings for diverse people searching to exercise horticultural, agri-mechanical, or various computer skills to make a better future. Email resume to [email protected]

>> Nurseries, Garden Centers, Gift Stores: Is your retail location a resource for Water Conservation, Responsible Beauty, Wildlife Habitat? Please give us a call 325-446-3600 for 2021 wholesale pricing on lawn and garden packages. Approved Retail Partners are listed on our Buy Local page.

With over 48 million acres of lawn in the US, it is high time we reduce or replace thirsty, pesticide ridden, energy consuming landscapes with crucial wildlife habitat. Meadow and prairie plantings are the most logically natural appproach. By planting for wildlife, we are planting for human life. Bring nature home. Become native to your place.

Looking for diverse seed mixes?

Long before beginning Native American Seed in 1988, we had already dedicated our work to restoring integrity in relationships between people, wildlife, land, water and plants. The work has always been about connections of all kinds. among all the relative beings. The integrity of our seeds comes from the natives only that we grow. We are thankful for your interest in our work.

Now is the time to plant many of the wildflowers that are part of the “rainforest” in our area of the planet – the plains and prairies. From smaller pocket prairies to larger restorations, these native seed mixes are ready to find new homes where they can begin to re-establish their balance in nature.

At Native American Seed we deeply appreciate big hearted folks like Sara Dykman who are spreading light. Her new book Bicycling with Butterflies is available April 2021. Even if you can’t bike the migration, you can be a part of it by providing native plants and milkweed for the monarchs and other pollinators. We are in this together. We each make a difference.

And from our close neighbor, don’t miss what Turk Pipkin is workin on: Nobelity Project / Monarch Mission Milkweed.

With so much negative energies swirling about us, many people are saying:

“I just want to do something positive today”
�I would like to plant good seeds in the meadow.�
�I have hopes of a more beautiful tomorrow.�
�I want to feel like I belong, touch the earth, and restore the land.�

Back here at the farm, we�re working �til dusk again. Planting more rows than we had last year. We must carry on. We plant for next year�s crop. because we are farmers. We have faith in life.

Texas is home to more than 3,700-streams & 15 major Rivers. Totaling 191,000-miles, riparian areas are essential in storing and protecting water quality, preventing erosion, and providing nutrients and habitat for fish, fireflies and wildlife. Our actions (or lack of) can sustain healthy, vibrant natural riparian areas for all to enjoy now and in the future.

Often, the best thing you can do for stream banks is leave them alone. Heavy equipment compacts soil, making recovery difficult. Cleared, manicured turf lawns are extremely low stabilizer plant communities offering little soil protection or water filtration. After flooding, leave downed trees and drift in place where practical. Native, deep-rooted, diverse plant communities work together with big dead wood, limbs and debris to help dissipate floodwater energy, filter and trap sediment, and stabilize soil and plant recovery. Regeneration can occur naturally in riparian areas especially where there are existing healthy uplands in place.

Touch the earth and quietly listen. 150 years ago only native plants grew here. Though many changes have occurred, they would love to come back home. We encourage you to become native to your place

NEW Conservancy Wildflowers:
Smooth White Penstemon – tubular white-pink large flowers that bloom in pairs and attrace native bees, especially the Long Tongue Bees & Bumble Bees. Hummingbirds and butterflies also benefit from its sweet nectar.
White Rosinweed – Blooms in the hottest time of year when few other resources are available.
Blue Wild Indigo – Beautiful deep indigo blue pea like blooms.
Bicycling with Butterflies – 10K+ mile jouney following monarch migration. Sara Dykman did it solo, on a bike cobbled together from used parts.

Shade-Friendly Widlflowers:
Shade-Friendly Wildflower Mix – make effective use of dappled sunlight in and around woods and other areas of shade
Blue Curls – eye catching color, unique bloom pattern
Pigeonberry – hardy, low-growing native
Cowpen Daisy – dependable bloomer and essential butterfly nectar source
Frostweed – during freezing temps, see unique ice formations formed as sap leaks from split stems

“Why Native Plants”is an excerpt from Urban & Suburban Meadows published by Catherine Zimmerman. To learn more, visit The Meadow Project.

If we choose to re-connect to our outdoor living spaces with the diversity of native plants, many benefits will return to the land. Benefits to many species, but to the humans too.

Wondering what to plant? Many of the natives can be seeded now. Erosion Control Blankets – are helpful at holding moisture & valuable topsoil.

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South American Yellow Popcorn Seeds

Sowing: Prepare the soil with compost or other organic matter. One week after frost or when the soil consistently reaches 60 degrees F, plant the corn 1″ deep and 8-12″ apart. Planting blocks of four short rows ensures good pollination. Germination should take place in 5-6 days. For companion planting benefits, plant corn with cucumbers, peas, or pole beans; plants that like shade also do well with corn. Avoid planting tomatoes near corn.

Growing: After the corn emerges, keep it moist and carefully remove weeds; since corn cannot fight against weeds, mulch may be beneficial. Additional organic matter or compost helps growth, since corn is a heavy feeder. Keep in mind that corn has shallow roots which can easily become damaged by hoeing. Watch out for pests, as corn attracts many problematic insects and animals.

Harvesting: Leaving the corn on its stalks to completely dry in the field gives the best results; when they are ready to harvest, the stalk and the ears will be completely brown with no green coloring at all. However, since continued rainy weather and humidity compromise the quality of the ears, it may be necessary to continue drying them inside. Choose a dry location with moderate heat, but out of direct sunlight; hang the stalks upside down, or lay them out flat.

Seed Saving: Since corn cross-pollinates quite easily with other varieties, seed plants will need to be separated from other pollinating varieties of corn by about 1,000 feet or otherwise prevented from pollinating each other. Allow the seed corn to dry completely on the stalk, until the husk and the stalk have turned brown. If rainy weather comes, cut off the stalks and lay them out in a dry, well ventilated location. Test for dryness by hitting the kernels with a hammer; if they shatter, they are ready for storage. Remove the kernels by running your hands over the cobs; winnow out the chaff. Store seeds in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Zea mays

Type: Open Pollinated, Heirloom, Warm Season

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Seeds per Ounce: 170

Planting Method: Direct Sow

Sunlight: Full Sun

Height: 60 Inches

Color: Yellow

DESCRIPTION

IN-STOCK ORDERS SHIP THE NEXT BUSINESS DAY VIA THE US POST OFFICE.

A wise choice for popcorn lovers! This prolific variety bears 2 or 3 ears per plant that are 6″ to 9″ long. When popped, the large yellow kernels produce a buttery tasting popcorn.

According to evidence found by archaeologists on the northern coast of Peru, popcorn was a staple in the ancient civilizations of South America. Popcorn also grew above the border, and it once occupied a space in nearly every American garden. At the beginning of the twentieth century, 52 varieties of popcorn were offered by the seed catalogs of the time.

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Prepare the soil with compost or other organic matter. One week after frost or when the soil consistently reaches 60 degrees F, plant the corn 1″ deep and 8-12″ apart. Planting blocks of four short rows ensures good pollination. Germination should take place in 5-6 days. For companion planting benefits, plant corn with cucumbers, peas, or pole beans; plants that like shade also do well with corn. Avoid planting tomatoes near corn.

Growing: After the corn emerges, keep it moist and carefully remove weeds; since corn cannot fight against weeds, mulch may be beneficial. Additional organic matter or compost helps growth, since corn is a heavy feeder. Keep in mind that corn has shallow roots which can easily become damaged by hoeing. Watch out for pests, as corn attracts many problematic insects and animals.

Harvesting: Leaving the corn on its stalks to completely dry in the field gives the best results; when they are ready to harvest, the stalk and the ears will be completely brown with no green coloring at all. However, since continued rainy weather and humidity compromise the quality of the ears, it may be necessary to continue drying them inside. Choose a dry location with moderate heat, but out of direct sunlight; hang the stalks upside down, or lay them out flat.

Seed Saving: Since corn cross-pollinates quite easily with other varieties, seed plants will need to be separated from other pollinating varieties of corn by about 1,000 feet or otherwise prevented from pollinating each other. Allow the seed corn to dry completely on the stalk, until the husk and the stalk have turned brown. If rainy weather comes, cut off the stalks and lay them out in a dry, well ventilated location. Test for dryness by hitting the kernels with a hammer; if they shatter, they are ready for storage. Remove the kernels by running your hands over the cobs; winnow out the chaff. Store seeds in a cool, dry place.